ARTISTS

At Obeidi’s Fine Art Gallery, we carry the largest inventory of naturalist painters in Alaska. From Fred Machetanz to Bev Doolittle and everything in between. Over the years we have been able to introduce many successful artists and we offer framing services to professional painters, photographers and artists in the Alaska Art and Frame Center. The retail public is also welcome to utilize our modern framing services.

Carl Brenders

Carl Benders

Carl Brenders (born 1937) is a naturalist and painter, born near Antwerp, Belgium.The painter is most famous for his detailed and lifelike paintings of wildlife.

Some of the artist’s accomplishments include illustrations of wildlife for La vie secrete des betes, a book series (published in English as Nature’s Hidden World), and being named the 24th Master Artist at the 2002 Birds in Art Exhibition at Leigh Yawkey Woodson Art Museum in Wausau, Wisconsin. His art is the subject of the books, Wildlife: The Nature Paintings of Carl Brenders, Song of Creation, and Pride of Place: The Art of Carl Brenders.

30 of the artist’s works were a part of the major retrospective exhibition Artistry in Nature: The Wildlife Paintings of Carl Brenders which opened at the Carnegie Museum of Natural History in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and then traveled to Cleveland, Ohio, Louisville, Kentucky, and Shreveport, Louisiana.

shadow
Stephen Lyman

Stephen Lyman

Through Stephen’s art, you can travel into a wilderness very few have experienced. You can share the sensation of being in the true outdoors – discovering, studying and enjoying the all-encompassing beauty of unspoiled nature.

Stephen Lyman was an explorer who specialized in painting the most elusive moments in nature. His inspiring work was inspired, in turn, by the writing and teachings of famous naturalist John Muir. “Muir wrote, ‘Climb the mountains and get their good tidings,'”

Stephen’s desire to share his admiration for the outdoors was strong, but he enrolled in the Art Center School of Design in Pasadena, California, to learn more about the commercial art field. He started his career as a commercial illustrator in Los Angeles and soon realized that the call of the wild was stronger than the lure of the city. “All my paintings have their origins in my experience and perception of beauty in the wilderness,” he said.

shadow
Ed Tussey

Ed Tussey

Alaska is a never-ending source of inspiration for Ed Tussey. Winner of national and state awards, Ed is a full-time, freelance artist who captures on canvas the majesty of Alaska’s interior, coastal and marine environments and wildlife. A lifelong Alaskan, Ed lives on the Kenai Peninsula in the coastal town of Homer, Alaska, with his wife Jacki and their daughters Rachel and Rheanna.

Collectors of Ed Tussey’s art are drawn to the impeccable detail with which his brush carefully defines, and realistically portrays, birds, mammals, and marine life in their natural settings. Ed’s ability to accurately represent Alaska’s wildlife stems from years of observing these magnificent creatures in their natural habitats on land and sea. He studied art and oceanography while attending college in Washington state. He has spend countless hours in remote wilderness areas and has traveled extensively throughout the coastal waters of Alaska, the Pacific Ocean and the Bering Sea.

shadow
Bev Doolittle

Bev Doolittle

Doolittle attended college at the Art Center College of Design in Los Angeles, where she met her husband, Jay Doolittle.The Doolittles, after a brief career as graphic artists, became traveling artists in a motor-home around the American southwest, painting scenes of the landscape as they went. It was during this period that Bev’s expansive paintings of the American Western landscape and its wildlife began to develop and soon after, she began to portray Native Americans—often including them alongside animal themes.

A unique and distinctive aspect of her art is what she refers to as “camouflage technique” in which certain details of her art can be seen in more than one way; for example, in “The Forest Has Eyes”; the rocks and waterfalls seen close up appear as the faces of Native Americans when viewed from a distance.
Perhaps her most impressive work is a twenty-four set collection of paintings of dark-brown horses set against light brown rocks and white snow, which from a distance and arranged in order spells out the words “Hide and Seek”.

shadow
Fred Machetanz

Fred Machetanz

Fred Machetanz was an Alaskan painter and illustrator who specialized in depictions of Alaskan scenes, people and wildlife. He first came to the territory in 1935, when he traveled to Unalakleet to visit his uncle, Charles Traeger, who ran a trading post there and spent 2 years developing a portfolio of Alaskan scenes. After leaving Alaska, he spent some time as an illustrator in New York, but longed to return to Alaska. He returned in 1942 after volunteering with the U.S. Navy and requesting a posting to the Aleutian Islands during World War II. After the war, he trained for a short time at the Art Students League in New York, studying lithography under Will Barnet, and then returned to Unalakleet in 1946.

Machetanz married Sara Dunn, a writer, in 1947, and the two settled near Palmer, Alaska in 1951. The turning point in Fred’s painting career came on April 21, 1962, when Bob Atwood, editor and publisher of the Anchorage Times, arranged for a one-man show of his paintings. The works at the show sold quickly, and the success allowed Fred to pursue painting full-time.

shadow
Robert Bateman

Robert Bateman

Bateman was always interested in art, but never intended to make a living from it. He was fascinated by the natural world in his childhood; he recorded the sightings of all of the birds in the area of his house in Toronto. He found inspiration from the Group of Seven; he was also interested in making abstract paintings of nature.It was not until the mid-1960’s that he changed to his present style, realism.In 1954, he graduated with a degree in geography from Victoria College in the University of Toronto.

Afterwards, he attended Ontario College of Education. Although the stage was set for an expert wildlife artist, Robert Bateman moved on to be a high school art/geography teacher. However, he still painted in his free time. It wasn’t until the 1970’s and 1980’s that his work started to receive major recognition. Robert Bateman’s show in 1987, at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, DC, drew a large crowd for a living artist.

shadow